AM Radio – February 14, 2016 Bank of Canada Controversy & Zika Virus Scam


AM Radio – February 14, 2016 Bank of Canada Controversy & Zika Virus Scam

First half guest, Canadian constitutional lawyer Rocco Galati joined guest host Richard Syrett to talk about his legal case against his government and its abandonment of the Bank Of Canada (the rough equivalent of America’s Federal Reserve) to pay for government projects. The organization was incorporated in 1934 to allow the government to borrow money interest free for such things as public works projects and national healthcare. Galati says that from its inception, this is what it did and it worked very well. However, in 1974, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau was convinced that money for government projects should henceforth be borrowed from the Bank Of International Settlements, a private consortium based in Europe. Although he was told that this would stabilize world financial markets, Galati described the resulting situation as “being enslaved to international loan sharks.”

Galati reminded listeners that this is not simply a Canadian issue, as it concerns most western democracies giving up economic control to private interests who are not answerable to any government, and that this situation has gotten much worse since the end of WWII. There are only a few countries who have bypassed this system for varying reasons, including China, India, Argentina, and Iceland. Galati says the yearly interest owed on loans to the Canadian Government exceeds the national military budget and “the healthcare budgets of several provinces,” to the tune of up to 40 billion Canadian dollars annually. In his legal case, Galati hopes to cast a spotlight on this issue and show how the situation is “a focused and indisputable case of how private interest can take away your government’s power.”

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In the second half, investigative medical reporter Jon Rappoport spoke about the recent Zika virus scare which is currently centered in Brazil. He contends that the hysteria surrounding this issue has been created as a cover for more serious health dangers having nothing to do with viral infections. The popular idea that the virus causes microcephaly (abnormally small heads and brain defects) in newborns may be a cover for more serious issues. Rappoport says the most recent report from the World Health Organization (WHO) has confirmed only 17 cases of suspected microcephaly from the Zika virus, which was discovered in 1947, and is only now being fingered for symptoms other than those of mild influenza. “They jumped the gun in Brazil in declaring this a massive outbreak of microcephaly because they didn’t have the numbers to back it up,” he said.

Microcephaly in developing fetuses can be caused by issues other than a virus, indicated Rappoport, such as bodily trauma, drugs, and environmental pollution. He believes that the virus theory is being used to cover the use of dangerous pesticides that have been proven harmful to human health. The public health warning to pregnant women and the suggestion that those in at-risk areas not have any children for at least two years, Rappoport says, is “depopulation by press conference,” and that once the fear is established, it can be used again at will. The hysteria also keeps governments from having to address conditions of life in poverty-stricken areas, such as sanitation. Rappoport also pointed out that the upcoming Olympics in Brazil will be a prime opportunity for the WHO to spread propaganda about the virus to a worldwide audience. The possibility of using genetically modified mosquitos carrying vaccines in their bodies to be used as “flying innoculators” was raised and Syrett and his guest agreed that this might be one of the most dangerous and serious violations of public trust to come out of the episode. Rappoport concluded by expressing his hope that “some serious whistlebowers” would emerge from the medical community in the near future.